Catholic Scout Patch Program: Saint George Saint Patch for Scouts

Dragon slaying is the stuff of legends, but learning about one supposed slayer and his journey in his faith is the basis of a scout patch from the National Catholic Committee on Scouting.

Who is St. George?

Saint George, the patron saint of England, is known and revered by both Muslims and Christians. His feast day is celebrated April 23.

According to Catholic Online:

In older works, Saint George is depicted wearing armor and holding a lance or fighting a dragon, which represents Christ’s enemies.

St. George is the patron saint of scouting (particularly Boy Scouts; St. Agnes is the patron saint of Girl Scouts). According to The Scouting Pages, Lord Baden Powell envisioned St. George as the patron saint because he held these “qualities that reflect good Scouting:”

  • Responsibility
  • Truthfulness
  • Devotion to duty
  • A brave heart
  • A noble spirit
  • Dedication to helping others

According to Baden Powell wrote about this patron saint in Scouting for Boys:

St. George was typical of what a Scout should be.

When he was faced by a difficulty or danger, however great it appeared, even in the shape of a dragon – he did not avoid it or fear it but went at it with all the power he could … That is exactly the way a Scout should face a difficulty or danger no matter how great or how terrifying it may appear. He should go at it boldly and confidently, using every power that he can to try and overcome it, and the probability is that he will succeed.

St. George’s Day is April 23, and on that day, Scouts remind themselves of their Promise and Scout Law. Not that a Scout ever forgets either but, on St. George’s Day, he makes a special point of thinking about them. Remember this when April 23 comes round again. [Read complete excerpt here.]

Earning the St. George Scout Patch

Saint George - Footsteps of American Saints patch - Catholic Boy Scouts - Catholic Girl ScoutsTo earn the Saint George religious activities patch, your scout will need to learn about the life and virtues about the real Saint George – not the stuff of dragon legends – and to examine how you yourself might improve in your faith journey as a Christian.

This is a series that encourages youth to learn about individuals who have shaped the landscape of Catholicism in America.

All youth and adults—Scouts or non-Scouts, Catholic or non-Catholic, male or female—are welcome to participate in the Religious Activities provided by the National Catholic Committee on Scouting. All of these activities may be used by groups, families, schools, or any Cub Scout, Boy Scout, Venturer, Girl Scout, American Heritage Girl, or Campfire USA.

Download the full requirements for the Saint George Religious Activity Patch.

Learn more about Saint George:

Children's books about Saint George of England
Saint George: Patron Saint of England

Saint George the Dragon Slayer: St. George, defender of the helpless and slayer of dragons is a saint honored by many countries and many religions. He is as popular with Muslims and Jews as he is with Christians. How could this happen? We know dragons never existed. How could someone be so well known and honored worldwide for something that could never have happened?

Saint George: Dragon Slayer

Saint George: Dragon Slayer provides a unique way to teach children ages 5-8 about Christian history while inspiring them to follow in the heroic footsteps of a courageous saint who stands up for all that is good and true.

The Saint Who Fought the Dragon: The Story of Saint George

Note: This post contains affiliate links, which help support our scouting adventures and this blog.


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